Over 100 years ago, Trinity Lutheran was founded on the principle that it wanted to grow and be relevant in an exciting city. Built in the center of the city because most members walked to church, it was a community church.  There are many stories about people walking to church in groups. Scandinavian immigrants, many working in the building trades, took pride in constructing their church and being supportive of others in their times of need. In searching the parish notes, there are stories of families struck with a disaster and individuals stepping forward to help and to start a fund drive.

 

Being a community church changed as White Plains expanded. Trinity moved from a mostly European congregation to a worshipping community from many nationalities.  In the 1960’s White Plains planners spoke of expanding the city north. The area near North Street and Bryant Avenue was to have new building projects that would be like a new community. Our church took the risk of moving outward as well. Although the building of homes never happened, the intent to remain on the cutting edge remains a goal for us.

 

Trinity has members involved in many aspects of this community. As example, the congregation regularly contributes food to the White Plains Food Pantry. Some members also volunteer on distribution days.  A father with his teenage son spearheads  t­­he ventures to New York City on “Mid-night Runs”. It is a program to bring homeless New Yorkers food, clothing and have dialogue with them.  Both youth and adults come back touched by those they met. Our members look for new ways to be relevant in this community.  Trinity is helping the White Plains Superintendent of schools begin a ment­­­or program at the grade school level. Some of our members will meet with a student weekly.  Pastor Norm meets with more than one group of area clergy to discuss ideas like “what one church may not be able to accomplish alone, many can together.”  That “shared ministry” challenges individuals to discern his or her gifts and how each can serve God in “our little corner of the world.”

 

In nurturing each other, we have fellowship events and a weekly Bible study.  Our worship committee has experimented with various styles of services, yet maintain the tradition of Lutherans. We have had successful folk and jazz worship as example. We use a screen to highlight sermon ideas on occasions. Now we are using an “on- screen” bulletin which is easy for visitors to follow.  Come and give our worship a try.